Your sense of gratitude to God must be for the good and bad that happens to you

IF YOU MUST GIVE THANKS TO GOD FOR THE GOOD THAT HAPPENED TO YOU, YOU MUST ALSO GIVE THANKS TO GOD FOR THE BAD THAT HAPPENED TO YOU!

Ozodi Osuji

     In the here and now conscious level, the rational individual feels that he does not have even 1% control over what happens to him. If 99% of what happens to you is not within your control it makes sense to assume that a higher power, called God, is in control of the 99% (if you are an atheist, you could use the world chance).

      Thus, when good happens to you, you are more likely to thank God for it, for you do not see how you are entirely responsible for what happens to you. So far so good.

      If you are not responsible for most of the good that happens to you and you must thank God for it, since you are equally not responsible for most of the bad that happens to you, you must also thank God for them (or curse him for them).

      Listen, if you must be grateful for the good that happens to you, logic rquires you to also be grateful for the bad that happens to you.

      If you think about it, you often learn as much from the bad that happens to you as you learn from the good that happens to you.

     I do not have false modesty; in that light, I know that I have incredible understanding of human psychology and philosophy; this knowledge is largely because of my childhood sense of weakness and inability to do what most healthy kids did effortlessly. My childhood sense of powerlessness and helplessness disposed me to be initially angry at God for doing that to me and to later to think about the benefits I derived from not being a jock: I am thoughtful because of my failure to do the physical stuff that other people did effortlessly.

     (If you are physically weak and cannot play soccer, you stay in your room and read, and that was what I did as a kid. I doubt that you can mention an English novel by the well-known writers that I did not, as a child, read; I read all of Shakespeare, Milton, Pope, Chaucer and so on before age fourteen.)

     The point is that a sense of gratitude must be for the good and bad that happens to one. Think about this proposition, it is the mind set of mystics.

      If Jesus had not been crucified, from his ego point of view, bad, he would not have died to his ego and thus become an example of a son of God, on this side of heaven, who willingly relinquished his ego and regained awareness of his real self as the son of God, Christ, hence regained the powers of the son of God in heaven.

Ozodi Osuji

November 21, 2021

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