AFRICANS SELDOM LOOK INTO THEMSELVES AND KNOW WHO THEY ARE

AFRICANS SELDOM LOOK INTO THEMSELVES AND KNOW WHO THEY ARE; THEY SEEM SCARED TO LOOK INTO THEMSLEVES AND KNOW WHO THEY ARE HENCE THEY LIVE STUNTED AND WARPED LIVES

Ozodi Thomas Osuji

Of all the human beings that I have related to Africans are the most afraid to investigate themselves and try to understand themselves. They are afraid to investigate themselves and understand who they are. It is as if they are charmed by something and it prevents them from trying to understand who they are. They are afraid to study psychology and psychiatry probably because they understand that they are mostly insane people; a people who for, at least, two thousand years sold their people to Romans, Arabs and Europeans and in the present instead of doing their best for their people steal from them  are an insane.

In so far that Africans have some understanding of psychology it is to use it to abuse each other and call each other crazy and other such names (symbolizing that they are afraid of being crazy).

An African read where I tried to understand my childhood’s efforts to overcome my sense of inferiority and called me put down names; I decided to direct my guns at him and told him exactly who he is, a child of no more than nine years old, developmentally; he is another shiftless African even though he has a doctorate degree in political science. If I choose, I can be devastating; I believe that by subjecting the African clown to psychoanalysis I must have destroyed whatever self esteem and self-confidence he has.

Instead of Africans trying to understand why they are backward, and always doing the wrong things, are the butt of the world’s laughter they blame white folks for their backwardness;  the truth is that they are screwing up big time. They live to engage in nepotism and steal from the public treasury instead rolling up their goddamned sleeves and developing all of Africa regardless of ethnic groups.

All the Africans that I have run into are abnormal. I can honestly say that I have not seen one healthy and sane African. They are either neurotic, personality disordered or outrightly psychotic.

One of the reasons why no one governs Africa right is that Africans are insane; their supposed leaders are mainly personality disordered or psychotic but do not know it.

Try talking psychology or psychiatry to Africans and see them run away and go continue jabbering their usual inanities that they call conversations. Honestly, talking to the average African and listening to his silly prattle I feel like I am talking to uneducated child! And this includes those of them with doctorate degrees!

Africans lack of insight into their behavior patterns astonishes me.

I hope that through my writings I will get some of these stunted and warped people to develop the courage to start looking into themselves and know who they are and change what can be changed in them and live with what cannot be changed, for in life we cannot change everything in us that we want to change.

If we live in bodies, we must live with imperfections; C’est la vie, such is life. The perfect ones, gods, are in heaven, not on earth.

WE ARE THE SLAVES OF THE SELF CONCEPT AND SELF IMAGE AND NEED TO EMANCIPATE OURSELVES FROM THEM.

FREEDOM LIES IN HAVING NO SELF-CONCEPT AND SIMPLY DOING WHAT THE MOMENT ASKS FOR

I am the slave of my self-concept and concurrent self-image. Apparently, in childhood I formulated a self-concept for me and translated it to a self-image.

I said apparently, for none of us remembers when he deliberately formulated his self-concept; what happens is that around age five or six  each human being, perhaps, as George Kelly noted in his book, Personality as a personal construct(1958), building on the experience he had with his inherited body and social experience formulated a self-concept for his self and does not know how he did it.

Once the self-concept is posited in childhood it is translated to a self-image, a picture in one’s mind of who one thinks that one is, and one thereafter tries to live up to it.

Another name for self-concept and self- image is personality; personality is the individual’s habitual pattern of behaving, his predictable pattern of behaving.

Personality can be normal, disordered, or psychotic. Most people are normal (normality is not mental health, no human being has perfect mental health); normal simply means that one’s behavior conforms to one’s people’s cultural norms (which may be insane). About ten percent of the people have personality disorders, such as paranoid, schizoid, schizotypal, narcissistic, histrionic, anti-social and borderline and avoidant, dependent, obsessive-compulsive, and passive aggressive personality disorders. About one percent of the human population have psychosis (schizophrenia, manic depression, aka bipolar affective disorder, and delusion disorder).

From about age six I have been aware that I have a self-concept and everything I have done is in accordance with that self-concept and self-image; I am always trying to live up to my self-concept and self-image; I seldom do anything that is not in accord with my self-concept and self-image; I dedicate my life to acting out the dictates of my self-concept and self-image.

The self-concept and self-image are kind of like a play one wrote in childhood and throughout one’s life one dramatizes the roles that that play calls for one to enact.

My self-concept and self-image are a wish for me to become important, and superior to overcome my underlying belief that as I am, I am not good enough.

FREEDOM LIES IN HAVING NO SELF CONCEPT

Freedom is to live without effort to live up to one’s self concept and self-image. If one has no self-concept and self-image one simply does what the moment calls for and is not playing the roles dictated by one’s prior self-concept and self-image.

One liberates one’s self from the slavery of having a self-concept and self-image when one gives up one’s desired self-concept and self-image.

Without self-concept and self-image, one is now a part of life flowing in whatever direction life moves through one and one has no anxiety from fearing not living up to one’s limiting self-concept and self-image.

Freedom is having no self-concept and self-image for self-concept limits what one does in one’s life.

THE PROBLEM WITH IDEALISM IS THAT IT IS UNATTAINABLE AND GIVES ONE ANXIETY AND ANGER

In idealism one is always  moving to the direction of how one ought to be, how other people, society and things ought to be; it is rooted in a desire to change one’s self that one perceives to not be good enough into a better body and self.

The problem is that no matter how much one  tries to change one remains one’s inherited  body and self and will never be a different body and self ; one will never be an ideal self, so idealism is pointless and a waste of time.

In reality one accepts one’s body and self and people as they are and makes the most of who one is, makes the best of what one has, what nature gives to one, for one cannot change one’s body.

No one ever achieves the ideal self and ideal anything, but it merely gives one anxiety from trying to live up to the mentally constructed ideals and concurrent fear of not living up to them lest one fails and dies.

Idealism also makes one prone to anger for anger results from perceiving obstacles to not being ones cherished ideal self; perhaps, another person does something that prevents one from attaining one’s ideal goals and one feels angry at him.

With less ideals and acceptance of one’s reality one tends to be less prone to fear, anxiety and anger; if one is less idealistic and realistic one tends to live in peace and happiness.

The idealistic person is prone to blaming other people for his failures in attaining his goals; blaming other people enables him to retain his desired ideal self; if he accepts his imperfection he would have less desire to blame other people when his goals are not met.

 

Ozodi Thomas Osuji

November 20, 2020

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