Wednesday, 22 November 2017 10:03

The beliefs in our subconscious minds shape our dreams and day behaviors

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Jewells Olson: I think that you already understand this phenomenon but our conversation, yesterday, made me restate it in writing and share it with folks.

IF WE PUT FEAR INTO OUR SUBCONSCIOUS MINDS WE HAVE FEARFUL DREAMS AT NIGHT; IF WE PUT LOVE INTO OUR SUBCONSCIOUS MINDS WE HAVE LOVING DREAMS WHEN WE SLEEP; IF WE PUT DESIRE FOR POWER AND WEALTH INTO OUR SUBCONSCIOUSN MINDS WE HAVE DRAMS WHERE WE ARE POWERFUL AND WEALTHY; IF WE SEE OURSELVES AS POOR WE HAVE DREAMS WHERE WE ARE POOR. DOES THIS PHENOMENON TRANSLATE TO OUR DAY LIVES?

Ozodi Thomas Osuji

Clearly, the  ideas that we put into our subconscious minds shape our nightly dreams; if you put fear into your subconscious mind you will have dreams where things scare you; if you put love into your subconscious mind you will have dreams where you love people and people love you; if you put desire for power and wealth into your mind you will have dreams where you have wealth and power; if you have the belief that you will be poor you will have dreams where you are poor; our dreams mirror what is in our subconscious minds, our beliefs.

It does not matter whether what we believe is right or wrong; the subconscious mind simply translates it to appropriate dreams for us to experience while we sleep and dream.

In dreams our minds show us what we think and believe; our dreams are the outward representation of our beliefs; dreams mirror our thinking and beliefs.

But does this phenomenon translate to our day life, too? If you put fear into your subconscious mind do you feel fearful in your day life; if you put love into your subconscious mind do you feel loved in your day life; if you put desire for power and wealth into your subconscious mind do you have power and wealth in your day life; if you see yourself as poor and or deserving poverty do you have a poverty filled life?

The answer to all those questions is unqualified yes. If you believe yourself fearless you will behave fearlessly; if you see you as a loving person and love people you will see people around you reciprocate with love for you; If you believe that you are worth power and wealth you behave in such a manner that you attract power and wealth into your life; if you believe that you deserve to be poor you behave in such a manner that you reinforce the belief that you are poor and you will be poor.

What you believe and place into your subconscious mind influences your day life (and nightly dreams, of course).

The good in all these is that you can consciously put positive ideas into your subconscious mind, believe them and they shape both your dream and day lives.

Africans, for example, believe that they are worthless, inferior people and that they are born criminals; they behave like worthless, inferior criminals in their day world; even their leaders are mostly criminals in government to steal from the people. They can change this negative self-concepts and self-image and believe that they are worthwhile people; they can see themselves as folks with moral integrity and in their dreams and day lives behave like people with self-respect.

Whatever you put into your subconscious mind shapes your nightly dreams and day behaviors.  You are the one who determine the type of world you experience; you shape your reality.

We collectively shape our collective reality but you shape your corner of it. If you understand this phenomenon you can decide to have a new beginning and have positive thoughts and those shape your life's outcomes.

Ozodi Thomas Osuji

November 22, 2017

www.centerformindscience.org

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Ozodi Osuji Ph.D

Ozodi Thomas Osuji is from Imo State, Nigeria. He obtained his PhD from UCLA. He taught at a couple of Universities and decided to go back to school and study psychology. Thereafter, he worked in the mental health field and was the Executive Director of two mental health agencies. He subsequently left the mental health environment with the goal of being less influenced by others perspectives, so as to be able to think for himself and synthesize Western, Asian and African perspectives on phenomena. Dr Osuji’s goal is to provide us with a unique perspective, one that is not strictly Western or African but a synthesis of both. Dr Osuji teaches, writes and consults on leadership, management, politics, psychology and religions. Dr Osuji is married and has three children; he lives at Anchorage, Alaska, USA.

He can be reached at: ozodiosuji@gmail.com (907) 310-8176