Sunday, 21 January 2018 15:24

Shame On Nigerian State Governors Who Owe Teachers' Salaries for Months

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We were suspecting but we were not sure why the Nigerian education is in such a terrible disarray at the primary and secondary school levels. We blamed half-educated teachers and lazy, unmotivated students. We forgot one important thing. We are now adding a third variable to the equation, governors who think teachers are such unimportant Nigerians they do not deserve salaries.

The new equation is  T (1/2)  +   S (u)    +    G(d)  =  SS (f)

T (1/2) is half-educated teachers, who have little knowledge of teaching area or teaching methods

S (u)   is unmotivated students who focus more on money, drugs and television than schoolwork

G (d)  is the dishonest governor who plays abracadabra (magic) with teachers’ salaries. Ought to resign position immediately.

SS (f)  is failed or failing school system

The Nigerian Union of Teachers  has identified 10 states that “are owing both primary and secondary school teachers salaries running into twelve months as the case may be.” According to NUT, the states  are Abia, Adamawa, Benue, Bayelsa, Delta, Ekiti, Kogi, Ondo, Kwara and Taraba. We suspect the total amounts owed teachers in back pay could be running into millions or billions of naira. The thoughts that keep worrying about my country are many.

The purpose of this essay is to shame, embarrass, and insult  the stupid Nigerian governors who think it is being smart ass  to stoop so low as to steal from Nigerians hired to educate our children. Being a governor does not ipso facto make one clever. Stupidity comes in all forms and in all shades, tribes, and occupations, and even in persons who rig elections to become governors, illiterate public servants.

Do these governors or their wives feed the families of Abia or Taraba teachers who have not been paid for months? Do teachers in Adamawa  and Benue have school-age children , and if they do, who pays the children’s school expenses? Assuming the teachers in Kogi and Ekiti are still going to work, where do they get the money to ride the bus, taxi, or keke to work?  Do the governors provide free transportation?

Who pays the doctors when Ondo  and Bayelsa  teachers and/or their children get sick and must visit the hospitals?  What hospitals? Shall we hope the hospitals are functional, that the governors are not colluding to withhold salaries of the medical staff, or a teacher in Delta dies in the operation room because the governor “accidentally took” the money that was to pay for electric light? To accidently take describes a thieving governor, a stupid man.

A governor is stupid when he sends his wife and children to bed each night on empty stomachs, when he thinks he can go to his office and discharge his duties without sending a messenger to “fetch me a bowl of garri, groundnuts, and banana make I chop.” A stupid governor is unwise, senseless, ill-advised, imprudent, thoughtless, injudicious, rash, irresponsible, or plain foolish.

The foolish governor withholds paycheck from teachers because he believes teachers are docile, meaning  that teaching is a profession where membership  is marked by being passive, quiet, unassuming, compliant, tame, submissive, meek, obedient. The foolish governor assumes onye nkuzi (Igbo for teacher) would not complain since he/she is a lowly pet anyone can kick under the dinner table. Surprisingly, the governor stupid as he is will dare not begrudge, resent a  month’s salary to his security guard.  He has to have security or the people he is withholding their salaries might attack him. We ought to hold our stupid governors accountable, oughtn’t we?

Dr. James C. Agazie; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ; jamesagazie.blogspot.com

Submitted Sunday, January 21, 2018

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James Agazie Ed D

A retired college Professor  with educational backgrounds in law (JD) education (Ed.D, MA) counseling,( MS) and and mathematics.  Write on topics dealing with Nigerian families, marriages, education, and employment.