Arts and Culture

The name Prince Tonye Princewill does not need any introduction to any person who has been a keen observer of the political milieu or terrain in the Niger Delta region and to be more specific the Rivers State political game. Born into the famous Princewill's family in Buguma of the ancient Kalabari Kingdom in Asari-Toru Local Government Area of Rivers State, Tonye who is fondly called 'TP' has made a name for himself not only as an entrepreneur, philanthropist, politician but also as a producer of home movie in collaboration with other famous and seasoned movie producers such as Izu…
Let’s pass it on to our children. “The great and most powerful gift a parent can give their children is to pass to them their language and their culture …” We would have loved it very much to write this in Yoruba but for two main reasons: one, we would love this article to reach and be readable and understood by all in the world, Yoruba and other peoples, and two, it is unfortunate, but our own written and spoken Yoruba has not reached the level where we will be most accurate, articulate and fluent in the translation of the…
Tuesday, 23 June 2015 03:52

Tola Adeniyi is a Brand

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THE tribute to literary giant Chief Tola Adeniyi by Chief Ebenezer Babatope in the Tribune of June 19, 2015 compelled me to add my voice to the many tributes already paid to this grossly under-reported, under-celebrated man of letters who recently turned 70. Akogun Tola Adeniyi, as he is fondly called by his Ijebu title, has been so many things since he came out of his mother's blessed womb that Tuesday, May 29, 1945. But the most remarkable and most enduring thing about his eventful and highly productive life is his huge fertile brain. His brilliance is simply extra-ordinary and…
Lagbaja's name in real life is Bisade Ologunde. The young man born and raised in Lagos began his music career in 1991. He is one hell of a Yoruba man whose real picture posted on the Internet to suggest he is not up to something criminal or cynical to always want to hide behind a mask on stage gives little clue about the man of steel he truly is, He has built a unique identity for himself in two decades of a music career that has catapulted him to being recognized as the founder or originator of Afro-Calypso in Nigeria.…
Saturday July 5th has been set aside by Ondo State Government, the Regent of Akure, Princess Dr. Adetutu Ojei nee Adesida and Akure Council of Chiefs to stage the grand finale of a goodbye to the late Deji. The ceremony puts a closure to all the rites and rituals reserved for every Deji who died in office. Kabiyesi Adebiyi Adegboye Adesida came and went like a flash in the sky having reigned for only 3 years. It is an occasion fit for paying our last respect to him while recalling all of his virtues and achievements including few of the…
Saturday, 03 August 2013 00:00

Who Are The Yoruba People? (Part 3)

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Up until 1292 BC and the ascension of King Menpehtyre Ramesses, all the Pharaohs of Egypt were black. These include some of the better known Pharaohs such as King Horemheb (who preceeded King Ramesses), King Khafra (who was depicted by the Great Sphinx of Giza), King Tutankhamun (the young Pharoah whose tomb was discovered with enormous riches and a terrible curse by a British archeologist and explorer called Howard Carter), Queen Cleopatra (whose beauty was enchanting, who captured the emotions of Julius Caesar and Mark Anthony, who divided the Roman Empire and whom this writer honoured with a poem titled…
Friday, 02 August 2013 00:00

Who Are The Yoruba People? (Part 2)

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In his 2000 page book titled ''Ile-Ife-The Source of Yoruba Civilisation'', Prince Adelegan Adegbola wrote the following about the yoruba people of south-western Nigeria- ''the Yoruba are the progeny of great kingship, efficient kingdom-builders and astute rulers. They have been enjoying for centuries a well-organized pattern of society, a pattern which persists, in spite of all the changes resulting from modern contacts with the western world. Their kings have, from very long past, worn costly beaded crowns and wielded royal scepters. No one remembers the time when the Yoruba people have not worn clothes. Their character of dignity and integrity…
Thursday, 01 August 2013 00:00

Who Are The Yoruba People? (Part 1)

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The yoruba people of south-western Nigeria are a nationality of approximately 50 million people the vast majority of whom are concentrated primarily within Nigeria but who are also spread throughout the entire world. They constitute probably the largest percentage of Africans that live in the diaspora and they have made their own extraordinary contributions in virtually every field of human endeavour throughout the ages. Descendants of the yoruba and indeed in most cases various ancient derivatives and forms of the yoruba language can be found and are spoken in places like Brazil, Haiti, Cuba, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Benin Republic,…
Tuesday, 14 May 2013 12:09

Ninety-Two Percenter

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Recently, through genetic testing, I've found out that my face cannot tell you what I truly am. I took a DNA test and the results were that my origin is 82 percent West African, 10 percent uncertain North American origin, and 8 percent British Isles. I haven't processed this knowledge. I'm not dark. I'm not light. I don't have many "African" features except for the butt and the hair. There are some genetic traits such as sickle cell gene and my reaction to dairy products as something toxic. But other than that, in the phenotypic sense, I'm a creation of…
Wednesday, 31 October 2012 00:00

Introduction to Igbo Medicine - Part 4

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Why do Igbo people go to ask? Ihe ekwo aju PATRICK IROEGBU*[1] Alberta, Canada This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Monday, March 27, 2006 Introduction When people are faced with a severe condition of life such as illness, social, economic, and political problem, including accident, untimely death, un-employment, robbery, inability to marry, inability to stay in marriage, or work, non-progress in career or school, infertility, bad luck, loss of wealth or money or trading capital, and non-patronage in business, the concerned persons will develop angst, trauma, fear, and diminished psychological momentum and empowerment to cope with their situation. They will do something about it by…
Monday, 29 October 2012 00:00

Introduction to Igbo Medicine - Part 3

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Igbo Modes Of Mobilizing Extrahuman Forces To Respond To Illness And Problems In Society - Iga N’ajuju (Part 3) PATRICK IROEGBU Alberta, Canada This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Monday, February 6, 2006 Both parts one and two of this presentation have outlined the definition and meaning of divination in the light of cultural device to manage episodes of illness in kinship based systems of society organization and relationships. Mirror divination is specifically elaborated to illustrate the sense of endogenous skills and creativity in a changing traditionism and modernism. This part three will take up two more modes of divination to establish the fact that…
Saturday, 20 October 2012 00:00

Introduction to Igbo Medicine - Part 2

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Knowledge of Herbal Resources and Development of Practitioners in Nigerian Society (Part 2) PATRICK IROEGBU Alberta, Canada This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Monday, March 6, 2006 Part one of this article explained the context under which healers are perceived and labeled in the biomedical healthcare domain of the so-called westernized modern society. It showed that education of healers is a fundamental development right that must be carefully woven around the cultural context and competency of the practitioners and their lives. It also pointed out that the problem of health diversity and indigenous knowledge which has been gaining attention since 1978 has not reached the…
Monday, 08 October 2012 00:00

Introduction to Igbo Medicine - Part 1

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Igbo Modes Of Mobilizing Extrahuman Forces To Respond To Illness And Problems In Society - Iga N’ajuju (Part 1) PATRICK IROEGBU* Alberta, Canada This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Monday, January 23, 2006 Nobody Wants to Write in this Area; Why? I have had a long standing interest in exploring African medical systems. As such, I introduce to you a course in African medicine and the perspectives of its practitioners. I am calling this course “Igbo Medicine” (IGBOMED 101). This way, I anticipate that readers will gain insights and stand up for Igbo medical heritage – therefore align it with vision in a changing global…
Friday, 21 September 2012 09:03

Floyd's Song (Mississippi Tales)

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“We had been out in the fields all day. Working. Not saying a word just working. Picking that cotton, man. It’s almost like that traumatized me more than Korea. Seems like my whole body remembers, you know, the movements of picking that goddamn cotton.” Mr. Graham went on with his story. “All a sudden there was a boom and then came a long drawn out scream like it came from inside some animal. I ran in the direction of both of ‘em. There was mah lil cousin. On fire! We tried to put him out but he had that diesel…
Saturday, 08 September 2012 01:18

Reality Unchecked Shadow People (novel excerpt)

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Shadow people, all of the humanity has either been removed or war really never there. Never developed. Never nurtured. Never guided into the beginnings of actualization. Only the shadow of what might be a person, remains. Mastering the art of daylight. I can stand the light. I am still immune to each day's sounds. Surrender? To what? Nothingness. Oblivion was the sweetest of verbs, the most welcome state of being. No feelings means no joy and no pain. The trade is so simple. Whether it be ten dollars, one hundred dollars, a blow job, a life, a home, a car…
Institute for Scientific Culture, ISC, Los Angeles, California USA We live in a world where we are faced with a barrage of ideas, each asking for us to embrace it for it sells itself as good for us. Black folks are particularly prone to been misled by competing ideas on culture. African Americans were separated from their African cultures and prevented from learning the culture of their slave masters. They were left hanging in the air. Since human beings are culture making animals, they used scraps of information they learned about their white masters' culture and what they remembered about…
I went down home in 1970. It was the year I turned four. I wasn't the only one traveled with them that night. My cousins who lived next door went too. Like so many other Black folks of that time had learned to do we left the house late at night (or early in the morning depending on your view) after the chicken had been fried and wrapped in foil, after the drinks had been placed in a cooler, after I had been awakened from the sleep they made me take at around four p.m., and after everyone had made…
Telling someone to forgive and forget, when you aren't present for their nightly parade of memories of the past, is sometimes another blow on the back of a wounded soul. I don't know how, but I have learned to forgive and I hope I learn this mythical thing called forgetting. The human mind is designed to have survival tactics imprinted within higher and lower brain functions. You learn how to walk, in part, because you look up from your crib and see everyone walking. The images are frozen into your mind until one day, you pull one leg to the…
Monday, 09 July 2012 00:59

Meeting Africa by La Vonda R. Staples

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www.lavondastaples.com Africa? Where did I meet her? I first heard of her from a real live African when I was in the fourth grade. Our teacher, Mr. Driskill, thought it would be a learning experience for an African to come and talk to his class. I attended Toussaint L’Ouverture Elementary and I have to confess that there wasn’t a single painting or representation, or even a story told about Haiti or the Revolution which would create the first independent country of Black people in the western hemisphere. In 1977, in those urban classrooms of St. Louis, we weren’t taught about…
Saturday, 07 July 2012 08:35

Yoruba vs. Bini – who founded what?

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One has to be intrigued by the long-standing feud between the Ooni of Ife and the Oba of Benin as to which city-state preceded which, and to whom did another contribute a royal genetics. At the center of this feud is the ego of ancient grandeur; it is the longstanding contention of cousins contending for legendary historical superiority. It was with an eye to resolving the mystery that I decided to undertake a literature review to try to decode the mysteries of the origin of the people of Ife and Benin. Literature review (or in this case oral tradition review)…
Friday, 16 March 2012 05:09

A Debt We Don't Owe

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www.lavondastaples.com We’ve heard it. We’ve seen it. We’ve felt it. We live it. The contract American society has taken out against Black men of every socioeconomic, academic, and cultural demographic. The “hit” transcends national boundaries and this is proven in the violent actions against African and Caribbean immigrant men, in example Amadou Diallo, who do not share language, customs, or even practices with African American men. The only commonalities necessary to receive a plunger in the rectum or to be over-killed in an apartment hallway is being male and Black. Juries make sure that the criminal justice system, for the…
Saturday, 12 November 2011 00:28

Reflections On Rap In Senegal

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American rap artists have gained new audiences through the advent of media campaigns in Sub-Saharan African countries, increased immigration, and internet access. As Africa’s population nears one billion persons, of which the majority are youth, it becomes an attractive target for market-creation as well as a possible source of artists. In this paper I will attempt to give a brief history of American hiphop as well as briefly compare and contrast African, specifically Senegalese, and African American artistes. West African countries have two, new invisible colonizers, a musical art form completely indigenous to America, the under current of hiphop, colloquially…
On July 26th at the Liberian embassy’s annual Independence Day reception for the Diplomatic Corps, Mokoli Productions, Inc. staged Happy 160th Birthday: Showcasing Liberia's Resources through Fashion. The display, featuring the Miss Africa International beauty queens and models, is part of a line promoting Africa's resources as many African countries approach their 50th independence anniversaries. The line includes diamond, copper, iron ore, rubber, rice, titanium, sugar cane, coffee and other resources found on the continent. Ellen Dunbar, the Liberian designer who also serves as executive producer of the Miss Africa International pageant, boasted of Liberia’s resources, stressing the significance of…