African Affairs

During the early period of the European adventurism into Africa, (1880s) only small portions of Africa were actually occupied by Europeans. These places were largely restricted to the coastal areas of Africa. The British had occupied Freetown in Sierra Leone, The Gambia, Gold Coast Protectorate, Lagos, and Cape Colony in Southern Africa The French were in Dakar in Senegal and was moving inland through the Senegal River, they were also in some regions of Cote d’voire, and Dahomey. Portuguese were present in Angola and Mozambique while the Spaniards had reached North West and the Spanish North Africa. The end of…
This paper’s thesis is that beginning with the dawn of Trans-Sahara slavery Africans learned to go capture their people and sell them to Arabs and later to Europeans. As a result, Africans developed lack of value for their lives and the lives of their fellow Africans. This self-disregard is now part of the African culture and psyche and contemporary Africans are socialized to internalize it. Consequently, Africans do not see their people as those that they ought to work hard or. The paper says that Africans must systematically be taught to love themselves and to work for their fellow Africans…
Appreciating the ridiculous low self-regard in contemporary Africans, manifested in Africans tendency to insult each other and steal from one another, this paper asks whether the over one thousand years Africans spent in slavery is the cause of their obvious low self-esteem? Did The Slave Experience Cause Africans Low Self Esteem? Ozodiobi Osuji For over a thousand years (from about 900 AD when Arabs began buying Africans) to about 1900 when both American and internal African slavery finally ended, Africans roamed around their continent capturing and selling their people to whoever wanted to buy them as slaves. It seems to…
Sunday, 24 February 2013 10:19

Who are the Wolofs?

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The Wolof are a very dark skinned, tall regal looking people who are very ethnocentric. They are found in Senegal, Gambia and Mauritania. They make up 44% of the population of Senegal, 16% in the Gambia and 8% in Mauritania. Although the Mandinka are 42% of Gambia's population, the Wolof language is spoken by most people, particularly in the capital Banjul. Wolof is the language of the Wolof people and and majority of non Wolof Senegalese speak Wolof. Overall, there are about 10 million Wolof speakers in Senegal, Gambia and Mauritania. Though still primarily an agrarian society, living in small…
Prior to the advent of Islam and Christianity, most Africans practiced traditional African religion. Christians and Muslims were in the minority. Even after 1900 when Christian and Muslim expansion reached its peak, traditional African religion still maintained relevance. Very much misunderstood, the religion has been called all kinds of derogatory names, from animism to paganism. Traditional African religion is much more than Westerners give it credit for. It is a global framework of life, encompassing every human situation and governing the whole society. Over 100 million Africans or 10% of the population still practice the religion full time. Unlike other…
Friday, 21 December 2012 19:19

Love Will Heal Africans And Their Societies

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This paper points out that Africans greatest problem is their lack of love for themselves and for one another. It says that this lack of love has long roots, including slavery times (those who love their people do not capture and sell them into slavery). It says that Africans contemporary economic and political problems can be explained by lack of love. Africans may postulate complex political, sociological and economic hypotheses to account for the lack of development in Africa, the continent’s inability to join the rest of the world in economic development and those hypotheses probably may have some merits…
As a follow-up to the last article on this subject, it is gratifying to report that three more dictators have lost their grips on power. Two lost their jobs as a result of the uprising in the Arab world, while one as a result of French and United Nations involvement. It is sad to note that amongst these three dictators, Muammar Gaddafi the former strong man of Libya lost his life under very tragic and humiliating circumstances. Laurent Gbagbo the former president of the Ivory Coast who had refused to step down after losing to Alassane Ouattara in the November…
Fear has been defeated in Tunisia and Egypt. Once paralyzed by the fear of challenging the dictators that held a strangle hold on their nations, they can now breathe a sigh of relief after decades of living under totalitarian regimes. Fear has been defeated was the phrase aptly coined by CNN newsman Anderson Cooper in describing the recent revolution in Egypt. Like their counterpart in Tunisia, the people of Egypt are relishing their new found freedom. They woke up on February 12, 2011 to a new dawn, a dawn without Hosni Mubarak, the former strong man who for Egyptians under…
Friday, 02 November 2012 00:00

Why Africans Should Become Buddhists

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Having observed Africans for a considerable period of time, the author says that they are full of their ego selves, that they live mostly from their egos and defend their ego selves and the result is self centered behaviors and the social conflicts and the wars that characterize Africa. He believes that African egos need to be shrunk to reasonable levels if Africans are to have a sense of society and work for the common good. He says that to the best of his knowledge Buddhism and other Oriental religions are the best means for shrinking, even eliminating human sense…
Thursday, 25 October 2012 21:29

Africans, Ego Based Religions And Spirituality

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This essay explicated what is generally meant by spirituality. It says that throughout the world human beings believe that if they lay aside their ego self concepts and empty their minds of all concepts made by the ego that they would tune into a different self and its world, a self generally called spirit. The paper delineated the nature of spirit and its world, as opposed to the material world of space, time and matter. The essay says that traditional African societies had spiritual practices that led Africans to devise their profound religions. Unfortunately, in the extant world, Africans seem…
Sunday, 02 September 2012 15:36

Self Esteem And Africans

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This essay defines what good self-esteem is; it says that in general many Africans do not have good self-esteem and may not even know what constitutes good self-esteem. It says that such Africans take the noisy behavior of those with low self-esteem trying to seem tough as good self-esteem. It says that good health, possession of work competencies, and enough money to live on and, more importantly, love and respect for one’s self and for other people are the makers of positive self-esteem in people. Self Esteem And Africans Ozodi Osuji What exactly constitutes good self-esteem and how do we…
Thursday, 02 August 2012 18:44

Africans Should Have Open Borders

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When you are around Africans their talk is almost always filled with what the colonial masters did to wrong them; everything is always the fault of the colonel masters. Even when African leaders kill their people they blame their former colonial masters for their mayhem. It is neocolonialism this, neocolonialism that. Talk is cheap so the brothers talk away and blame away but seldom take responsibility for their actions. It is action that is difficult and counts. So far Africans are missing in action; they do not translate their talk of how Africans are angels before white men corrupted them,…
Fiat Justitia! Ruat caelum. This adage of ancient provenance is a heart-rending plea for justice to pour like the rain! It supplicated justice to deluge our world like the Noachian deluge of old did in the fertile minds of the ancient Jewish Yawhist-tradition writers; even if the pillars of heaven are to collapse in the process. And time has proven over and over again, that Truth is the grand essential for justice. Without truth, justice is eviscerated of meaning and significance. This piece is the contribution of our feeble voice to course of truth and justice. This is an inscription…
1. Empires and Lynching Empires have always lynched dissidents. They have always murdered those who could not swallow their discontent, or let empire get away with the strangulating and toxic impact of its debaucheries. They have always bludgeoned those who refused to be intimidated by imperial impunities; and buried those who challenged their monumental indiscretions. They have forever banished and brazenly barbecued their opponents out of existence, with all the medieval cruelty, and inquisitorial wickedness in their arsenals. Empire has always crucified those who offered any resistance to its impious excesses, or those who couldn't bear imperial jackboots patiently. Jesus,…
Robert Mugabe is being lynched by Britain and her allies. And BBC is drafted into soft-bombing public opinion and public discourse with sleaze against Mugabe; even to the extent of Stephen Sackur using his daily platform Hardtalk of 8th July, 2008, with Fredrick W. der Klerk, as a guest, to openly call for military invasion of Zimbabwe to oust Mugabe and install a lackey of the British on Zimbabwe's corridor of power. This is against all international principles and protocols that made it a law in international relations to respect the sovereignty and territorial integrity of every sovereign country. This…
This paper hypothesizes that the over one thousand years that slavery took place in Africa, the constant capturing and selling of Africans by their fellow Africans to Arabs and Europeans, engendered certain spillover effects on Africans, such as their current corrupt cultures where few persons seem to care for the public good and the psychological pathologies seen in many Africans, such as paranoia and post-traumatic stress disorder. THE ENDURING EFFECTS OF AFRICANS KIDNAPPING AND SELLING AFRICANS TO ARABS AND EUROPEANS ON AFRICANS AND THEIR CULTURE Ozodi Thomas Osuji, PhD I read Joy Degruy Leary's (2005) book, Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome.…
(This paper is an addendum to my review of Dr. Woodson's, book, the miseducation of the Negro) Ozodi Thomas Osuji I am an existentialist thinker (if you do not know what existentialism mean begin by reading Sartre, Camus, Jasper, Heidegger etc.). Existentialists say that man is that animal creature that is self-aware. Let me personalize this discourse instead of leaving it at the wooly abstract level. I am aware that I am a part of the universe; I am able to study and understand the universe. I am the universe trying to understand itself. Alas, I am also aware that…
Wednesday, 20 June 2012 06:49

Still some Africans make no connections

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Folks put on your seat belts, it is going to be very turbulent in Egypt, another Somalia is possibly in the making. You would think Africans are capable of making rational judgements based on history. Many Egyptians are supporting the Muslim Brotherhood whose agenda is largely unknown, what we know for sure is that some radical elements within the Muslim Brotherhood are looking for another Islamist state in Egypt. What would it take for some people to understand that Religion and Government does not work!. Let us go a little deeper into History and learn that governments based on religious…
Have you ever asked this question: how do members of my African ethnic group come across to Americans, especially to African Americans? If you have not asked that question perhaps you ought to do so. You will learn interesting stuff about how you are seen as opposed to how you think that you are seen by other persons. People relate to you as they see you not as you tell them to see you! Each of us is an ambassador of our ethnic group and as we behave folks around us draw conclusions about us and people from our ethnic…
Tuesday, 06 March 2012 08:40

Making Strides: Women in African Politics

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Happy Women’s History Month! This is a great time to reflect on our accomplishments and to celebrate as African women. The 2000s brought unprecedented political opportunities for African women. Many countries strived to make good on their ratification of the Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) which called for, amongst other things, equal access to women in politics. To level the playing field, some states initiated quotas into their constitutions, others implemented appointments, incentives, or quotas at the party or legislative levels. For example, Kenya’s 2010 Constitutional Article 81b states, “not more than two-thirds of…
Sunday, 19 February 2012 05:49

The Future of Poverty In Africa

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The Millennium Development Goals (MDGS) were declared and made “compulsory” social policy option for third world countries. About the same time the United Nations adopted these goals as a palliative “arrest” option for the third world, the World Bank came up with a huge document on African, entitled “Can Africa Reclaim the Twenty first Century?” Without anybody saying so, both the UN and the World Bank held very pessimistic view about Africa ’s capacity to meet up to its social challenges, to reach or accomplish the limited and tentative targets set for it, but they did say so in too…
In this piece, I interpreted a dream to suggest that my father and the Africans he represents are lazy and lacking in leadership skills; that all they do is talk about their problems but do not go about solving them. The piece says that Africans have to change from being mere whiners about how rotten their world is to those who take initiative to solve the problems they see in their world. A Dream’s Suggestions On The African Character Ozodi Thomas Osuji Generally, when I wake up while having a dream I switch on the lamb by my bed’s side…
Tuesday, 07 February 2012 08:28

The African Child…Divided

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"Our country is that spot to which our heart is bound" (Voltaire). After 25 years of living in the United States a friend of mine finally retuned home. His desire to return has been in the works for almost five years; but as much as he tried, he couldn't bring himself to doing so as he couldn't get past the issue of basic infrastructures like NEPA, clean portable water, waste disposal, and other aspects of human security. To think that what most other societies take for granted -- law and order, abundant food supply, clean environment, first-rate schools, health care…
Monday, 09 January 2012 12:16

Was Olaudah Equiano Igbo?

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While in college, I read The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano or Gustavus Vassa the African (1789) and did not make much of it. Recently, someone told me that Chinua Achebe, the famous Igbo writer, claimed that Olaudah is an Igbo. I asked him how Achebe came to this conclusion and he did not know. I thought about it for a while and thought that Achebe is probably full of it. Why? Though I am an Igbo, I have a love-hate relationship with Igbos; I tend to be suspicious of whatever Igbos say. I had concluded that…
By Onima Institute http://onimainstituteusa.org/OLAUDA.htm Olauda Equiano Was a Son of Etsako in Edo Land : In Today Nigeria, and Yes, He Was Out of Africa A Rebuttal to Claims and Faulty Analyses Made by Two Eminent Scholars Here is an interesting argument about the true birth place of Olauda Equiano or Gustavus Vassa, the African. Below is our humble presentation which we believe stands to liquidate the claims that have been made by some eminent scholars which to me seem to amount to academic and intellectual dishonesty in this matter. Olauda Equiano was one of those taken away into slavery…